HASLEMERE DECORATIVE AND FINE ARTS SOCIETY

A member society of NADFAS

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Lectures are on the third Tuesday of the month.
There are no lectures in July and August.

Meetings begin at 2.00 p.m. for 2.15 p.m. at the Haslemere Hall.

Members are asked to register their attendance on arrival.
No admittance after the start of the lecture.
Tea, coffee and biscuits are served after the lecture which lasts about one hour.


Some past lectures have been
reported in the local press.

To read the articles, CLICK HERE.


2017
Place mouse cursor over the images for information

NOVEMBER 21st
Colonel T.E. Lawrence by Augustus John, 1919


A. G. M.   1.45  p.m.
Followed by
DR NEIL FAULKNER
LAWRENCE OF ARABIA: TORTURED HERO OF TROUBLED TIMES
There are different concepts of Lawrence of Arabia and these will be examined through various media.

Real–life hero and brilliant guerilla commander of an ’Arab Spring’ against the Ottoman Empire – or self–promoting charlatan? One of the greatest celebrities of the 20th century and also one of its most controversial figures, Lawrence’s legacy and writings are all too relevant to the politics and wars of the 21st. On the basis of sensational new evidence from archaeological fieldwork, Dr Neil Faulkner will contrast the legend with the true story of what happened in the famous desert war of 1916 to 1918.

Dr Neil Faulkner is an author, archaeologist, features editor of Current Archaeology, Honorary Research Fellow at Bristol University, Honorary Lecturer at UCL and a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. His TV appearances include Channel Four’s Time Team, BBC 2’s Timewatch and Channel 5’’s Revealed series.


DECEMBER 5th
Hunters in the Snow (detail) by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, 1565.


SUE JACKSON
THE ART OF SNOW AND ICE
How artists transformed the winter landscape.

The bleak midwinter held little appeal to the artist for many centuries until Bruegel’s Hunters in the Snow painted in the 16th century. From pristine backdrop to the tempestuous snow storms of Turner and to the capturing of ’snow effect’ by the Impressionists, the ability of artists to convey snow as a symbol of peace but also of grandeur and terror is compelling.

Sue Jackson is a history graduate and a Fellow of the Huguenot Society of Great Britain, who also has a background in art and art history. As a London Blue Badge Guide, she leads walks and tours all around London, on a wide range of themes, and she gives illustrated talks to a variety of audiences such the National Trust, NADFAS and historical societies.
HDFAS Christmas Tea
The lecture will be followed by Christmas Tea.
No booking is required.



2018

JANUARY 16th
The Great Pyramid, Giza, Egypt


DR STEPHEN KERSHAW
THE SEVEN WONDERS OF THE ANCIENT WORLD
Combining literary and artistic evidence for the monuments with examination of the sites where they once stood.

Two tombs, a couple of statues, one temple, a garden and a lighthouse have become celebrated as the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. But how much do we know about them? Why and how were they chosen? And, given that six out of the seven were destroyed long ago, can we recreate their size, beauty and majesty, and the shock and awe that they generated? Combining literary and artistic evidence for the monuments with examination of the sites where they once stood, this talk will try to make the vestigial traces of their grandeur come to life once again.

Dr Stephen Kershaw (B.A. (Hons.); Ph.D.) has had a special interest in the world of the Ancient Greeks and Romans ever since being introduced to Homer’s Iliad by an inspirational teacher at primary school. He studied Classics at Bristol University and having taught Classics in a number of establishments, he now operates principally for Oxford University Department for Continuing Education. He authored and teaches Oxford’s on–line Greek Mythology course, is a guest speaker for Swan Hellenic Cruises and Royal Hebridean Cruises and, as Professor of History of Art, he currently runs the European Studies Classical Tour for Rhodes College and the University of the South.


PAST LECTURES in 2017

JANUARY 17th
Detail of 12th century wall painting, Holy Sepulchre Chapel, Winchester Cathedral


ROGER ROSEWELL
MEDIEVAL WALL PAINTINGS
Seeing and understanding Medieval Wall Paintings including examples from our local area.

The faded ghosts of medieval wall paintings which are seen on the white walls of churches today give only a hint of their past glories – the decorative patterns and figurative imagery. Wall paintings are a unique art form, complementing, and yet distinctly separate from, other religious imagery in churches. Unlike carvings, or stained glass windows, their support was the structure itself, with the artist’s ‘canvas’ the very stone and plaster of the church. They were also monumental, often larger than life–size images for public audiences, used to beautify, to act as a devotional and instructional aid or to reflect the elevated position of the patron who footed the bill. Every lecture is individually tailored to the host Society and wherever possible includes local examples of wall paintings.

Roger Rosewell was educated at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University. A former journalist, he is a member of the Society of Antiquaries, Director of a private European art foundation, a life member of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Bulidings and a member or the Royal Photographic Society. As well as wall paintings, he specialises in medieval stained glass and is the Features Editor of the online stained glass magazine, VIDIMUS.



FEBRUARY 21st
A dark Pool by Laura Knight, 1908

Bookings open for Outing on Thursday 6th April


BERNARD ALLAN
LAURA KNIGHT: FROM NEWLYN TO NUREMBURG
Sunny beach scenes in Cornwall to her famous depiction of the Nuremburg war crime trials of 1946 painted by the first woman elected to the Royal Academy.

Laura Knight (1877–1970) was a painter in the figurative, realist tradition who embraced English Impressionism. She grew up in Nottingham but spent much of her time in Cornwall. She worked in oils, watercolours, etching, engraving and drypoint. In her long career she was among the most successful and popular painters in Britain. In 1929 she was created a Dame, and in 1936 became the first woman elected to the Royal Academy since its foundation in 1768. She was a war artist during WWII and in 1946 spent three months at the Nuremburg war trials which resulted in a large oil painting titled The Nuremberg Trial.

Bernard Allan has a BA (Hons) in History and an MA in History of Art. Having taken early retirement, he commenced a new career as an art history tutor for the WEA and has taught French and British art of the 18th and 19th centuries, as well as women’s art, for the past eight years. He lectures at various societies and guides parties around galleries in London and Paris. In addition to teaching, he is currently researching 19th century artists working in Sussex, with a view to publication.



MARCH 21st
Basingstoke station
Bookings open for Study Day on Wednesday 3rd May


RUPERT WILLOUGHBY
BASINGSTOKE AND IT'S CONTRIBUTION TO WORLD CULTURE
As Betjeman wrote "What goes for Basingstoke goes for most English towns". A humorously told episode in England’s architectural history.

Sadly, Basingstoke is one of the most derided towns in England, famous for its pointless roundabouts, its dullness, vacuous shopping centres and hostile modernist architecture. Rupert Willoughby explains that the post–war planners, who inflicted such features as ‘the Great Wall of Basingstoke’ on the town, were politically–motivated and bent on destroying all traces of its past. He reveals the nobler Basingstoke that is buried beneath the concrete, and the few historic gems that have survived the holocaust. Hilariously told, it is a story that neatly illustrates the ugliest episode in England’s architectural history.

Rupert Willoughby is a medievalist by inclination and specialises in the domestic and social life of the past. His approach is to inspire audiences by applying a light, humorous touch. He is the author of the best–selling ’Life in Medieval England’ for Pitkin and of a series of popular histories of places, including ’Chawton: Jane Austen’s Village’ and ’Basingstoke and its Contribution to World Culture’. He has published numerous articles, contributes regular obituaries to The Daily Telegraph, writes histories of houses, occasionally broadcasts to the nation and is an experienced lecturer, whose repertoire ranges from the life and personalities of the Middle Ages to the world of Jane Austen.



APRIL 18th
Yumbulagang Monastery, Tibet.jpg
Bookings open for Outing on Wednesday 14th June


ZARA FLEMING
TIBET – THE ROOF OF THE WORLD
This lecture will, also, include part of the extraordinary escape by Ama La (the lady who has made our tea for many years).

A general introduction to the history, art and culture of this extraordinary land, lying deep in the heart of Central Asia surrounded by some of the highest mountains in the world. Despite its geographical inaccessibility, it developed a rich and vibrant Buddhist culture and artistic tradition. This lecture gives a brief overview of Tibetan history from the time of the great Tibetan Empire (6th – 9th century) up to the present day; explores the fascinating art and culture inspired by Buddhism, introduced from India in the 7th century, and gives an insight into the current political situation.

Zara Fleming was initially based at the V&A, but has also worked with the Central Asian Department of Bonn University, the Orient Foundation, the Royal Academy, Tibet House, the National Museums and Galleries on Merseyside and Asia House. In addition to lecturing for NADFAS, she lectures for museums, universities, Asian art societies, and private associations. She is a guest lecturer and tour guide on numerous trips to the Himalayas. She edited Masterpieces of Mongolian Art: Vol 1 and has published many articles in the field of Buddhist art and culture.

When Zara Fleming last gave a lecture for HDFAS, she happened to recognise Ama La in the Annexe after her talk. She will recount something of Ama La’s extraordinary story.



MAY 16th
La Primavera (detail) by Sandro Botticelli, c. 1482, tempera on wood. Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence.


OPEN LECTURE
PART OF THE HASLEMERE FESTIVAL – EVERYONE IS WELCOME!


SHIRLEY SMITH
SANDRO BOTTICELLI: PAINTER OF FLORENCE
A look at his enigmatic works and the life and times which influenced them.

Alessandro di Mariano di Vanni Filipepi, better known as Sandro Botticelli (1445–1510) was an Italian painter of the Florentine school during the Early Renaissance (Quattrocento). At the height of his fame in the 1470’s and 80’s, he was one of the most esteemed artists in Italy. Vasari reported that he was initially trained as a goldsmith by his brother Antonio but by 1462 was apprenticed to Fra Filippo Lippi and by 1470 Botticelli had his own workshop. After his death his reputation was eclipsed more thoroughly than that of any other major European artist, having fallen out of fashion towards the end of his life. Nevertheless, he was greatly acclaimed again in the 19th century, especially in England by the Pre–Raphaelites, who found that he legitimized their style, which combined the sensuous and the immaterial.

Shirley Smith, a NADFAS lecturer for 15 years, graduated from the University of East Anglia with first class honours in History of Art. Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and part–time lecturer for the University of East Anglia and for the Department of Continuing Education of the University of Cambridge, she also lectures for the Art Fund and individual clubs and societies. She specialises in Italian and Northern Renaissance art and architecture and is particularly keen to set the art and architecture of a period in the context of the society for which it was produced.



JUNE 20th
Still Life by Ben Nicholson, 1940s.
Bookings open for Study Day on Wednesday 4th October


JO WALTON
THE NOT–SO–STILL LIVES OF BEN NICHOLSON
The lecture explores the development of his beautiful images, set against a background of conflict – personal, international and artistic.

Ben Nicholson (1894–1982) was born into a very creative family and became one of Britain’s leading abstract artists in the years before the Second World War. Best known for his beautiful still life and landscape paintings, which combine representational and abstract elements in a disciplined harmony, he was a great champion of Modernism. His personal life, however, was not always so harmonious. Married first to the painter Winifred Nicholson, and later to the sculptor Barbara Hepworth, his art challenged that of his father, the highly successful Edwardian painter Sir William Nicholson. What was it about their relationship that drove Ben? And how does Ben’s career reflect the wider conflicts between abstract and traditional art forms in the mid twentieth century?

Jo Walton read art history at Leicester University, then went on to do a post-graduate diploma in Oxford, specialising in the art and architecture of fifteenth century Italy. She has had a successful career in selling art books and set up and ran the Atrium Bookshop in Cork Street, London, and worked at Christies the auctioneers. She is now a freelance lecturer for Dulwich Picture Gallery, The Art Fund, local art groups and NADFAS societies and on P&O cruise liners and is a guide at both Tate galleries.



SEPTEMBER 19th
Stolperstein for Max and Olga Mayer, June 2013, Heidelberg, Germany
Bookings open for Outing on Thursday 9th November


ANGELA FINDLAY
THE OTHER SIDE: GERMANY’S POST–WW11 CULTURE OF MEMORIALS AND COUNTER MEMORIALS
Germany’s complex process of remembrance which resulted in the fascinating counter memorial movement from the 1980’s onwards

Relatively little is known in this country about Germany’s complex post–war process of remembrance and the counter memorial movement that started there in the 1980’s and continues to this day. Germany’s very specific situation rendered all traditional concepts of monuments and memorials irrelevant and inappropriate. Instead of commemorating their own losses German artists looked to creating art forms that would respond to questions of apology and atonement: how does a nation of former persecutors mourn its victims? The idea behind counter memorials is to keep the memories and lessons of the past alive in the individual psyches of the people. The results are extraordinary, brave, and inspiring.

Angela Findlay is an artist, lecturer, writer, consultant and teacher – the common thread linking all these roles is her passion for instigating behavioural and emotional change through the medium of art. She is a motivational speaker in schools and societies in UK and Germany and became a NADFAS accredited lecturer in 2013 and Advisor to the Ministry of Justice on Art as Rehabilitation for Prisoners in 2016.



OCTOBER 17th
Bonaparte Crossing the Alps by Jacques–Louis David,1801


CAROLE PETIPHER
THE COLLECTIONS OF NAPOLEON AND JOSEPHINE
An insight into one of history’s most famous couples through the exploration of their collections at Chateau de Malmaison.

Now a museum–château, Malmaison is known for its collections of art related to the lives of Napoleon Bonaparte, Josephine, and their children Eugene and Hortense and was the private residence of Napoleon and Josephine (formerly de Beauharnais) from 1799 to 1814, a "place in the country" just half an hour from Paris, where the First Consul came to work and relax. Unlike official residences, Malmaison remained an intimate home renowned for the beauty of its gardens and the several hundreds of rare species of plants that were introduced here, until the death of Josephine in 1814 who had recieved the property in her own right after her divorce from Napoleon. Entirely redecorated in an antique style by Percier and Fontaine in 1800, the château contains a remarkable panorama of art of the Consular period.